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Zoetrope Strips


London Stereoscopic & Photographic Company

Series No.3


25. TUCK IN YOUR TUPPENNY

Eric Partridge's Dictionary of Historical Slang derives "tuck in your tuppenny" from rhyming slang. It means "tuck in your head". Rhyming slang gives "tuck in your loaf of bread". "Loaf of bread" becomes "tuppenny loaf" and then "loaf" is dropped. It seems "tuck in your tuppenny" was a necessary instruction if you were playing leapfrog- otherwise, painful injuries could ensue.
26. FOOTSTEPS BENEATH HIM


27. CATCHEEE, CATCHEEE, CATCHEE


28. THE INDIAN JUGGLER (moderate motion) (to be confirmed)


29. MORE STINGS THAN HONEY


30. ENGINE AND FELINE (to be confirmed)


31. YOU'RE GETTING VERY BALD, SIR (to be confirmed)


32. SAIRY DEFENDS HER PATTENS

Pattens are protective overshoes that were worn from the Middle Ages until the early 20th century. They were worn outdoors over a normal shoe, had a wooden or later wood and metal sole, and were held in place by leather or cloth bands. Pattens functioned to elevate the foot above the mud and dirt (including human effluent and animal dung) of the street, in a period when road and urban paving was minimal.
33. THE WHEEL OF LIFE


Lester Smith


34. A WELL-KNOWN DOMESTIC TRAGEDY (moderate motion) (to be confirmed)


35. THE MODERN MAN IN THE MOON


36. DON'T YOU WISH YOU MAY GET IT?


Martin Gilbert


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